Malignaggi vs Lora October 15th Staples Center

 Boxing star and former world champion Paulie Malignaggi will fight October 15th at Staples Center vs Orlando Lora. The fight will be on the HBO PPV card of Hopkins vs Dawson. Check out this what Malignaggi has to say about his fight.

Q            

Tell us about this fight. Tell us what you know about Lora and how you plan to approach this fight.

Paulie Malignaggi          

Lora-I don’t know too much about him. I know he’s got a 28-1 record and he’s fought as high as Junior Middleweight and Welterweight. He’s probably a man bigger physically than me, but my style of fighting is not really of the physical kind.

I guess he may try to bring a physical kind of fight, but in any video that I’ve watched of him he tries to box, so I don’t know. I don’t know what to really expect from him because he may see a small guy in front of him and try to be a bully or he may just think what he really wants to do is box so I’m preparing for either thing. I’m always trying to prepare myself mainly and get myself sharp and then I’ll have the opponent really worry about me more so than me worry about the opponent. That’s the plan. That’s usually what the plan is and that’s the plan now for this kind of fight as well.

 

Q            

Where do you think you are as a fighter now in terms of your career? Obviously you guys are around the same age as Lora, but you’ve had a better career. You’ve had better titles and things like that. Where do you think you are in terms of eventually getting a title shot against somebody?

Paulie Malignaggi          

I don’t think I’m too far off. Between my ability to win fights and the strong team I have behind me with Golden Boy Promotions and Anthony Cantanzaro, my manager, I think I’m very close if not for a world title or at least for a big fight that could lead to a world title. One way or the other I’m knocking on the door for something.

Like I said before I feel like I still belong because guys below the world class level I tend to still dominate them. I need to be competing at a world class level and I look forward to getting back there.

Q            

Is this weight fighting at Welterweight, how has that affected you? Do you feel that really suits you the best at this point?

Paulie Malignaggi          

Yes. Just with age it got tough to make the Junior Welterweight limit. Making Welterweight I feel like I have more spring in my legs. I’m not going to say I’m going to hit harder, but I definitely feel stronger at Welterweight just because I don’t have to struggle as much to make the weight. Definitely the biggest improvement is the spring in my legs and just the energy level I’m able to maintain and keep because I don’t have to waste it on making weight. When I get in the ring I can still have that mental spunk and just be able to box the way I want to box.

Q            

Do you want to make a prediction for this fight?

Paulie Malignaggi          

I don’t really have a prediction. I just plan to win and I plan to dominate Orlando Lora. If I don’t dominate Orlando Lora I’ll be disappointed in myself, obviously. Not taking anything away from Orlando Lora, but it’s just that I’ve seen … in my career than him. Like I said before anything not at the world-class level I have been dominating and Lora, although he’s 28-1, has not fought at a world class level. The plan is to dominate him and that’s pretty much, I guess, the prediction.    

Q            

I had a question too, about the weight, but you already answered that so I just want to ask about a change in getting out of Brooklyn and training in L.A. How much of a difference has that made for you?

Paulie Malignaggi          

It’s pretty cool. Sometimes I get homesick for back East, but it’s pretty cool. The Wild Card Gym is definitely a place I don’t regret coming to train, I’ve got great sparring, I’ve got a great trainer, Eric Brown. The weather in L.A. is great; it’s a chill place.

I enjoy being out here. Don’t get me wrong, there is only one New York and I do a lot of times get homesick and stuff, but I don’t regret coming out to train here. It was a great move for my career. I’ve made some new friends out here as well and I plan to continue to train out here.

Q            

I understand. I lived in New York, too. Living down South it’s a huge change of pace for me        so I can only imagine someone who lives 1000 miles an hour like you, it’s got to be tough. You must feel like you’re living in slow motion out there.

Paulie Malignaggi          

Yes. The pace of life is definitely slower even out here. That was hard for me because I figured like L.A. would be a city like New York and everybody would be in that rush mode. Although L.A. is exactly the opposite-it’s a city, but that’s about where the comparison ends to New York. New York is a rush-everybody trying to get somewhere, do something. L.A. is more of a laid back chill atmosphere where nobody really has anything to do. At least it feels that way a lot of times.

Sometimes I’m in that New York mentality where I want to get somewhere and I can’t get anywhere because this L.A. traffic is hard. I guess that sometimes it does get frustrating. One thing I will say in L.A, they have the worst drivers I’ve ever seen in my life-in my life. No one compares to L.A. as the worst drives in the world.

Q            

You’ve got to come down South for that.

Paulie Malignaggi          

They’re able to drive off the road going two miles an hour. At least if he’s going fast that’s one thing, but if you’re able to rear-end somebody or drive off the road going five miles an hour, you’ve got a problem.

Q            

Yes, no doubt.

Paulie Malignaggi          

Other than that, like I said I think there are more pros than cons to L.A. at the end of the day, though.

Q            

I was going to say do you think it’s kind of a metaphor for where your career is at right now? You’re used to just running fast-paced, but now it’s become like more of a marathon for you, you’re not sprinting towards a world title now, you’re at a proper pace so it’s rebuilding toward the championship run.

Paulie Malignaggi          

Yes, yes. Actually that’s a good point. It is kind of like a metaphor where I have to like-slow and steady wins the race kind of thing, you know? That’s kind of the mentality that my team has for my career at the moment I think, that slow and steady eventually wins the race instead of the rush, rush that I always felt I needed to do and be. Yes, it’s sort of a metaphor in a way because L.A. definitely is slow and steady instead of rush, rush.

Q            

Right, no doubt. All right, if you’re going to use it just make sure you give me credit for it, all right?

Paulie Malignaggi          

All right.

Q            

Believe it or not I’m getting ready to make a post off of our interview in Las Vegas. Going back to that, you kind of touched on it in your two previous answers; you seem really mentally more relaxed at this weight class. I have to think that it has to do with the fact that you don’t have to suck so much weight over the last couple of weeks to get down to weight.

We talked about your fight against Amir Khan, obviously he’s a good fighter, but it factored in that you were having to lose so much weight. Can you talk about the freedom of not having to do that and how much it allows you to concentrate more on your skill closer to the fight as opposed to concentrating on losing the weight?

Paulie Malignaggi          

Yes, well, first of all it has more of a positive effect on me in that my moods are better and I’m just a happier person. As the fight comes along I can be more focused on the fight because I know even if I’m above weight I know I’m not going to have trouble making it. Obviously knowing that, I’m able to really put pieces together to the puzzle better as far as solving my opponent and concentrating on a game plan and just all that other stuff.

Really though, more than anything is, like I said, it’s the energy level, the energy level that I get to keep and maintain. Because when you have nothing to lose and you’re losing an extra five, six, seven pounds, on top of having nothing else to lose, it gets difficult. It’s difficult to maintain the energy level. Knowing I’m going to have that and then just being in a much better mood for not having to suck out that weight.

It allows me to be able to focus and concentrate better. It’s definitely a move that I needed to make and it’s definitely a move that I’m glad I made.

Q            

Your last fight you beat Jose Miguel Cotto, who some people might say you had an easier time against him than Canello did. Do you make that comparison and how much emphasis do you place on the way that you beat Cotto as far as the way you’re going to fight in this division?

Paulie Malignaggi          

I don’t really emphasize or compare how I beat one opponent to how another guys beats an opponent. I just kind of just go out there and do my job. I know when I dominate an opponent when I look good and when I have to-what it is for my style to do it. Me and Canelo have sort of different styles so Canelo dominating an opponent may mean something else as opposed to me dominating an opponent, or anybody else dominating an opponent that I’m having.

I don’t really make that comparison. I felt like I dominated my opponent Cotto once we got past the first round I got timing down. I was able to box his ears off. If I hadn’t hurt my hands I think I could have actually stuck it out more to really at least-he’s got a good chin, but I could have at least upped the tempo of the fight to where it might have forced a stoppage. My hands were just killing me there. I actually hurt both of my hands in the last fight. They were hurting so bad that the second half of the fight I just lowered them. I basically was on a budget for my hands and I lowered the tempo.

I was happy with the performance, all things considered. I outboxed him. I outboxed him very well. I’ve got to credit my trainer Eric Brown and Wild Card Gym while we work on a lot of new things and also we get a lot of great sparring. Being out West and training out West also helps out.

Q

How are your hands?

Paulie Malignaggi          

My hands felt good so far. Honestly in the gym I don’t really have too many problems with them because I get to wear big gloves and I get to wrap them the way I want to. Obviously in a fight you can’t pad the hands as much as you have little aeon plugs so that’s sometimes where I run into problems, but so far so good. Hopefully everything remains fine and dandy on the 15th.

Q            

I have a question-you said you felt like if your hands weren’t hurting you could have knocked him out. Your first fight at Welterweight you scored a knockout and it was pretty impressive against Michael Lozada. Do you feel like you’re able to somehow sit down more in your punches? What is your power a function of at this weight class?

Paulie Malignaggi          

I don’t know if I’m sitting down more on the punches. I do think my trainer has imposed-to implementing a little bit of a more of an offensive approach to it. I think that comes more from training out West. I know this Wild Card Gym is a very offensive minded gym so I think it just kind of starts to rub off on me, just training out here.

Having said that I think it’s just more of a matter if I’m at a world-class level and I’m fighting non-world class opponents there is always the potential to stop them as long as my hands are healthy because you start putting punches together and ripping off combinations and you kind of overwhelm people.

I don’t know how many one punch knockouts you’re going to see me get, although I have had those in the past as well, but just because somebody is not on your level-it doesn’t matter how many knockouts you’ve had you’re going to stop them just on the beating.

I think that’s what happened with the Mike Lozada fight and I think had I not hurt my hands it would have happened in the Jose Cotto fight. It’s hard to stop a world-class opponent, but when you’re fighting sub-world class opposition and my hands are healthy, I think I get a bad rap for the power and the KO ratio because a lot of it has to do with the injured hands. Early in my career I had many more problems than I do have now. That was really affecting the KO ratio at the time where why shouldn’t we get more stoppages?

Q

Paulie, I’ve got a question for you. We pretty much talked about everything with the weight issues, your hands, and everything. In 2009-2010 you had a lot of up and down moments. People were starting to write you off, a lot of people questioned why would you even go to Welterweight feeling that was a division you were way too small for, but thus far you’ve been great with your last two wins.

Do you feel any pressure that every win or every bout that you have now you have to win in like a dominant, very convincing fashion to have people starting to talk about you again and consider you a genuine threat in the title mix at that weight class? Or are you just willing right now just to slow it down, take it one fight at a time and just let things come how they are?

Paulie Malignaggi          

I did put a lot of pressure on myself to try to make everybody happy and try to win a certain way and make sure I was doing and make sure I was doing that and all that stuff, but honestly man, I don’t really think about that anymore.

I don’t really read too many magazine articles or web sites or anything. I kind of just-so I don’t really-it’s not even that I made a conscious effort I actually just lost interest in doing that stuff. If everybody wants to have an opinion on what I’m supposed do and what I’m not supposed to do I’m really not hearing it. The way I look at it is this, Golden Boy is my promoter; they get me the fights.

They line them up and if I can keep knocking them down then eventually something good is going to happen-a world title shot is going to come my way and then hopefully everything works out. I’m just looking at it more like I’m doing my job and my team does their job and together we move forward.

I don’t really have to look at the criticism or the compliments even. I can just go forward and do my job. Boxing is my job. It’s how I make my money so it’s more so that’s how I look at it. I have a job to do when I get in the ring. It’s my responsibility to go out there, put on a show, and win fights. I try to do that to the best of my ability every time I go out there.

Monica Sears    

Paulie, that was our last question for today so if you want to say any closing remarks before getting off the line.

Paulie Malignaggi          

No, basically I’ll close it out the way I started it. I look forward to being on the show October 15th. I’m glad Golden Boy put me on the TV portion so thanks to Golden Boy; thanks to my team. I’m really happy I signed with them and I’m glad the more opportunities they give me the more I hope I can show my gratitude to you guys by continuing to win. 

Paulie Malignaggi          

Thank you.